psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present

:Episode Seventy-Eight: 10.13.2017

Artist Title Album
UUUUVerlagerung, Verlagerung, VerlagerungUUUU
PaperhausBismillahAre These The Questions That We Need To Ask?
Sound Of CeresIo Scenic A/BThe Twin
Jay Glass DubsSkull DubJay Glass Dubs vs. Guerilla Toss
Dedekind Cut (ft. Mica Levi & Elysia Crampton)Das Expanded, Untitled RiffThe Expanding Domain
7FOQuiet FlashQuiet Flash / Water Vapor 7"
Super Static FeverAcid Sweet HappeningSilent Dynamic Torture
Naked BeastAether StationNaked Beast
King KruleDum SurferThe OOZ
Matias AguayoNervousSofarnopolis
KillflavourHiding Nature?Forest Mirror
Necro DeathmortObeyOverland
Byron WestbrookLevitation GameBody Consonance
Prefix MonikerQuasi-NeutralityPlasmas
Smagghe & CrossOstende, Pt. 2Ma-Ep
Time WharpPatchedFeel No Pain
Listen at House of Sound

 

Description

This week starts off with a song from the unusually monikered UUUU, a supergroup of sorts featuring a member of Coil and two members of Wire (who, though I've never played them on my show, since I just don't think they're quite space-y enough, I do like a great deal) off their excellent self-titled debut out this week. We also hear Jay Glass Dubs echo-riffic reworking of Guerilla Toss's Skull Pop, which is, as I explain during the break, about the closest thing I'll get to playing anything reggae-related on the show, as while I consider quite a lot of reggae, especially the dubbed-out variety, rather psychedelic, it remains a somewhat divisive genre among music fans.

In the middle set, we hear a track by Super Static Fever,from their one and only early-90s self-released album, Silent Dynamic Torture, recently unearthed and reissued by Numero Group (who, since there no longer are any obscure soul records to reissue have apparently moved on to reissuing obscure shoegaze records). One of the Sick Burns™ that I like to deploy against bands I don't like is "they better hope their fans never find out about [band they sound like]." And, in the case of Super Static Fever (who I do like, albeit with reservations) I have to imagine the band they hoped their fans never found out about was Swervedriver, as, to put it verrrry mildly, they sound almost exactly like them. The thing is, too, in the pre-internet era, it was highly likely that a lot of their fans hadn't heard of Swervedriver, and so they could've gotten away with shamelessly aping them, at least for a time. I'd like to think that the reason they only released one album is that someone called them out at one of their concerts, a la the way that Jesse Eisenberg's character in the Squid and the Whale gets called out for trying to pass off a Pink Floyd song as one of his own.

Finally, we end with a set of spaced-out ambience, including Necro Deathmort, who, in spite of having a ridiculously black-metal-ish name, are in reality more on the dark ambient side. The track of theirs that I play even reveals that they have some Krautrock-ish leanings, as it includes a motorik beat that suddenly appears about two-thirds of the way through.