psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present
psychedelic and avant-garde music from the 1960s to the present

:Episode Seventy-Two: 9.1.2017

Artist Title Album
TeleplasmisteAst┼ŹdaanFrequency Is The New Ecstasy
Robert LeinerSwungMelomania
KondaktorKlapatsibanaAfrikanochetos
Msafiri ZawoseMalugaroUhamiaji
Sleep Party PeoplePoor LenoThe Missing Steps b/w Poor Leno
Wild WingGreen ReaperUnderground Heaven b/w Green Reaper
The Doomed Bird of ProvidenceBurrowed Into The Soft SkyBurrowed Into The Soft Sky
SkullflowerYuggoth WithinThe Spirals of Great Harm
BamboomanFrostWhispers
Massimo PupilloWagnerLive at Candy Bomber Studios, Vol. 1
Klaus SchulzeSchrittmacherEternal
Listen at House of Sound

 

Description

We start off the first show of the not-quite-fall that is September with a bit of drone from Teleplasmiste, followed up with some psychedelic electronica from Robert Leiner (from an album called Melomania, whose title I take to mean he's a real Carmelo Anthony fan), some African-inspired minimal techno from Kondaktor, and some "Afro-fusion" from Msafiri Zawose (the term "Afro-fusion" I put in quotes because it's how his label describes his music, and entirely new to me) who hails from Tanzania, which is, as a country, a result of Afro-fusion, being an amalgam of Tanganyika and Zanzibar (I'd have gone with Zanzitang or possibly Tanzibar as the resultant name, but that's a whole different issue.

Later on, we hear from The Doomed Bird of Providence with a long track from an concept album exploring the troubled colonial history of Australia. How this is reflected in the music I haven't the slightest idea (there are no didgeridoos, or sounds of shrimps being thrown on barbies, or Jacko, the guy from 80s Energizer battery commercials, shouting "Oi!")

The show ends with a piece of, uh... doom jazz, I suppose, from Massimo Pupillo, and a song from Klaus Schulze - off an album recently released in honor of his 70th birthday -that in the 1980s was used as a pre-loaded demonstration track for keyboards